The Ancient Origins of Werewolves

Tanika Koosmen, University of Newcastle The werewolf is a staple of supernatural fiction, whether it be film, television, or literature. You might think this snarling creature is a creation of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, a result of the superstitions surrounding magic and witchcraft. In reality, the werewolf is far older than that. The…

Why Universal Credit is Like The Victorian Workhouse

Alannah Tomkins, Keele University The UK’s Universal Credit programme, which aims to roll six forms of state welfare including unemployment and housing benefits into one, was launched in 2010 with the aim of supporting people to work. So far it has resulted in real hardship for numerous claimants. In early January, the minister in charge…

Archaeologists Find “XBox” Tomb In China

Archaeologists in China have uncovered a rather unique looking tomb, with commentators comparing it’s appearance to Microsoft’s famous Xbox logo! There is unfortunately little information available on the tomb beyond the tomb being Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC), yet the discovery has provoked a flurry of interest through the quite spectacular shape. The tomb is amongst…

Guide to the Classics: Juvenal, the True Satirist of Rome

Robert Cowan, University of Sydney An angry man stands at the crossroads and rails against the moral cesspit around him, teeming with sexual deviants and jumped-up immigrants. This is the image which the Roman poet Juvenal paints of the satirist castigating the vices of contemporary Rome. Juvenal’s Satires provide a fascinating window onto the social…

The Prosecution of Pirates Was a Model For Today’s System of International Justice

Mark Chadwick, Nottingham Trent University The Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, convened in the aftermath of World War II, are usually identified as the start of modern international criminal law. Prosecutions of international crime today take place either at international courts such as the permanent International Criminal Court in The Hague or, increasingly, in domestic courts,…

How Stereo Was First Sold To a Skeptical Public

Jonathan Schroeder, Rochester Institute of Technology and Janet Borgerson, DePaul University When we hear the word “stereo” today, we might simply think of a sound system, as in “turn on the stereo.” But stereo actually is a specific technology, like video streaming or the latest espresso maker. Sixty years ago, it was introduced for the…

Is The Famous Oak Island Lead Cross Really No Such Thing?

Of all the finds on History’s The Curse of Oak Island, perhaps none has sparked as much debate as the “lead cross” found during Season Five by detectorist Gary Drayton at Smith’s Cove on the island. The cross, which has been spuriously linked to the Knights Templar by the show, is of lead construction and…