The Ancient Origins of Werewolves

Tanika Koosmen, University of Newcastle The werewolf is a staple of supernatural fiction, whether it be film, television, or literature. You might think this snarling creature is a creation of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, a result of the superstitions surrounding magic and witchcraft. In reality, the werewolf is far older than that. The…

Why Universal Credit is Like The Victorian Workhouse

Alannah Tomkins, Keele University The UK’s Universal Credit programme, which aims to roll six forms of state welfare including unemployment and housing benefits into one, was launched in 2010 with the aim of supporting people to work. So far it has resulted in real hardship for numerous claimants. In early January, the minister in charge…

Guide to the Classics: Juvenal, the True Satirist of Rome

Robert Cowan, University of Sydney An angry man stands at the crossroads and rails against the moral cesspit around him, teeming with sexual deviants and jumped-up immigrants. This is the image which the Roman poet Juvenal paints of the satirist castigating the vices of contemporary Rome. Juvenal’s Satires provide a fascinating window onto the social…

52 Roman Era Skeletons Discovered in Suffolk, England – Many Decapitated

An archeological dig in Suffolk has uncovered 52 excellently preserved skeletons at a Roman era cemetery. Alongside cemetery treasure, diggers have uncovered something far more grizzly – many of the skeletons had been beheaded! Digging at Great Whelnetham ahead of a new housing project, it was found that only seventeen of the skeletons had been…

Blowing Up The Parthenon: The Power of a Symbol

Bronwen Neil, Macquarie University The Parthenon is one of the most famous and recognisable buildings in the world. Designed as a testimony to Athenian greatness, visible miles from the Acropolis (the citadel) on which it stands, the Parthenon still stands proudly among the remains of a massive complex of buildings that celebrated Athens’s deities. It…

Mark Zuckerberg’s Admiration For Emperor Augustus is Misplaced. Here’s Why

Frederik Juliaan Vervaet, University of Melbourne On his 2012 honeymoon to Rome, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg took so many photos of the Roman Emperor Augustus’s sculptures that his wife joked it was like there were three people on the honeymoon. The couple even named their second daughter August. Explaining his fascination for Rome’s first emperor,…