How Stereo Was First Sold To a Skeptical Public

Jonathan Schroeder, Rochester Institute of Technology and Janet Borgerson, DePaul University When we hear the word “stereo” today, we might simply think of a sound system, as in “turn on the stereo.” But stereo actually is a specific technology, like video streaming or the latest espresso maker. Sixty years ago, it was introduced for the…

The Myth of the American Frontier Still Shapes U.S. Racial Divides

J.M. Opal, McGill University When Americans study their 19th-century history, they tend to look at its great conflicts, especially the epic clash over slavery. They are less likely to recall its broad areas of agreement. But what if those agreements are still shaping the present? What if Americans are still coping with their effects? The…

In 1968, Computers Got Personal: How The ‘Mother of all Demos’ Changed The World

On a crisp California afternoon in early December 1968, a square-jawed, mild-mannered Stanford researcher named Douglas Engelbart took the stage at San Francisco’s Civic Auditorium and proceeded to blow everyone’s mind about what computers could do. Sitting down at a keyboard, this computer-age Clark Kent calmly showed a rapt audience of computer engineers how the…

How Black Slaves Were Routinely Sold as ‘Specimens’ to Ambitious White Doctors

The history of human experimentation is as old as the practice of medicine and in the modern era has always targeted disadvantaged, marginalised, institutionalised, stigmatised and vulnerable populations: prisoners, the condemned, orphans, the mentally ill, students, the poor, women, the disabled, children, peoples of colour, indigenous peoples and the enslaved. Human subject research is evident…

Lost City of Etzanoa Now Open To Public In Kansas

The lost city of Etzanoa, one of the largest Native American archeological sites in the entire United States, has been opened to the public. Located in Arkansas City, Kansas, experts believe the site may exceed the size of the Cahokia Mounds. Using new translations of Spanish conquistador documents that were compiled by researchers at the University of California…

Historic Artefacts Discovered During Cleanup of New York’s Gowanus Canal

Several artefacts of historical interest have been found during the ongoing cleanup operation at New York’s Gowanus Canal, one of the dirtiest and most polluted bodies of water in the entire United States. The Gowanus Canal, originally known as Gowanus Creek, is a 1.8-mile canal in Brooklyn, New York, that was once a key part…

Possible Skeleton of Sir George Yeardley Unearthed at Jamestown

Archeologists digging at a 400 year old church in Jamestown, Virginia believe they may have uncovered the skeleton of Sir George Yeardley, one of the first politicians and slave owners in the history of the United States. The excavation at the church is a joint endeavour by the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution…