The Myth of the American Frontier Still Shapes U.S. Racial Divides

J.M. Opal, McGill University When Americans study their 19th-century history, they tend to look at its great conflicts, especially the epic clash over slavery. They are less likely to recall its broad areas of agreement. But what if those agreements are still shaping the present? What if Americans are still coping with their effects? The…

52 Roman Era Skeletons Discovered in Suffolk, England – Many Decapitated

An archeological dig in Suffolk has uncovered 52 excellently preserved skeletons at a Roman era cemetery. Alongside cemetery treasure, diggers have uncovered something far more grizzly – many of the skeletons had been beheaded! Digging at Great Whelnetham ahead of a new housing project, it was found that only seventeen of the skeletons had been…

Blowing Up The Parthenon: The Power of a Symbol

Bronwen Neil, Macquarie University The Parthenon is one of the most famous and recognisable buildings in the world. Designed as a testimony to Athenian greatness, visible miles from the Acropolis (the citadel) on which it stands, the Parthenon still stands proudly among the remains of a massive complex of buildings that celebrated Athens’s deities. It…

Mark Zuckerberg’s Admiration For Emperor Augustus is Misplaced. Here’s Why

Frederik Juliaan Vervaet, University of Melbourne On his 2012 honeymoon to Rome, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg took so many photos of the Roman Emperor Augustus’s sculptures that his wife joked it was like there were three people on the honeymoon. The couple even named their second daughter August. Explaining his fascination for Rome’s first emperor,…

Why Archaeology Is So Much More Than Just Digging

Richard Tuffin, University of New England and Martin GIbbs, University of New England It’s our experience that most people think archaeology mainly means digging in the dirt. Admit to strangers that you are of the archaeological persuasion, and the follow-up question is invariably “what’s the best thing you’ve found?”. Start to tell them about a…

How the Ancient Egyptian Economy Laid The Groundwork for Building The Pyramids

Andreas Winkler, University of Oxford In the shadow of the pyramids of Giza, lie the tombs of the courtiers and officials of the kings buried in the far greater structures. These men and women were the ones responsible for building the pyramids: the architects, military men, priests, and high-ranking state administrators. The latter were the…

Why There’s No Modern Guide To Surviving a Nuclear War

The risk of thermonuclear war has rarely been greater. But despite the growing threat, the general public are less prepared than they ever have been to cope with an attack. With Trump in the White house, Putin in the Kremlin, North Korea testing ballistic missiles and the perilous state of military security, nuclear war is…

World Politics Explainer: Pinochet’s Chile

General Augusto Pinochet Ugarte, a career military officer, was appointed Commander in Chief of the Chilean army by President Salvador Allende on August 1973. Eighteen days later, with the connivance, if not the assistance, of the US, he authorised a coup against Allende’s Socialist government. To be clear, Pinochet’s rule was not the first, last…